Eu me levanto

Eu me levanto
30 de October de 2018 Rafael Kamada

Regina Parra performs original project in Fábrica de Arte Marcos Amaro (FAMA)

In the exhibit “Eu me levanto”, the artist looks into eroticism and vulnerability as a way to build empowerment; Parra is the third artist awarded by Fundação Marcos Amaro occupation’s statute

A lascivious and robust but at the same time, vulnerable body. Here, the susceptibility and eroticism are resistance signs. A structure that is capable of surpassing limitations and then, transcending them. In face of this, a question: How to remodel and adapt these movements? It is what the artist Regina Parra studies in “Eu me levanto”, exposition that will start on December at Fábrica de Arte Marcos Amaro (FAMA) in Itu, São Paulo’s countryside.A lascivious and robust but at the same time, vulnerable body. Here, the susceptibility and eroticism are resistance signs. A structure that is capable of surpassing limitations and then, transcending them. In face of this, a question: How to remodel and adapt these movements? It is what the artist Regina Parra studies in “Eu me levanto”, exposition that will start on December at Fábrica de Arte Marcos Amaro (FAMA) in Itu, São Paulo’s countryside.

Conceived for Fundação Marcos Amaro’s occupation statute and curated by Galciani Neves, the exhibit borrows the title from one poem of the writer, poet and activist Maya Angelou, called “Still I rise” and displays artworks of a continuous Parra’s study: The Women’s body. The artist explores the body’s vulnerability as a way of empowerment. “Its a body that chooses to bloom rather than to shield itself”, explains the artist.

Regina Parra uses duality to tease the public. Ophelia’s sunken and passive body – Shakespeare’s noble from “Hamlet”, of fragile and tender character – reappears in a series of painted portraits “Tenho medo que sim (2018)”, but with vague gestures that shift from debauchery and the judgment.

Traditionally, portraits highlight public figures that had detained political, economical or social power. Throughout history, men were way more pictured, while women were popular among mythological and Christian iconography. “All of them echoed confining beauty ideals that denied female’s subjectivity”, says Parra.

It’s no accident that, Ophelia here, under the artist’s skin, transcends the traditional portrayal types, not showing the sweet and fragile Hamlet’s lover. Like an erotic game, her movements now create an implicit violent and sensual combination.

The artist evokes a body with new sensibility, compared to the affective, cultural and political storms of the contemporary life. It is a body, and like on Angelou’s poem, it still rises.

In “Lasciva”, original choreographic series that she directed in collaboration with Bruno Levorin, Regina imbues questions that cross eroticism, emotion, susceptibility and strength, establishing gestures, images and words produced in a relationship between two women.

Parra seeks to discuss the feminism nowadays and looks to discern the words “urgency” from “speed” in choreography. Its an invitation for the public to ponder about shapes, structures and gender’s implied performances. “Lasciva” will be presented during the exhibition and split in two acts, with a forty minutes break between them.

Regina Parra’s exhibit is the third project awarded by Fábrica de Arte Marcos Amaro’s Occupation Statute, promoted by Fundação Marcos Amaro, in order to foster contemporary art production. Edith Derdyk and Eduardo Frota were, in this order, the first ones awarded by the Statute.

The artist

Regina Parra (São Paulo, 1984) is Master in Arts Criticism and Theory. Graduated in Visual Arts, at FAAP. In the last couple of years, she exhibited artworks in the Millan and Leme galleries, Espaços Pivô, Centro Cultural São Paulo and Paço das Artes, all located in Sâo Paulo. She’s also displayed her work in the Fundação Joaquin Nabuco, in Pernambuco and in Effearte Gallery, in Milan.

Among her collaborative artworks, the projects that stand out are Sight and Sounds, at The Jewish Museum, in New York; FUSO – Festival Internacional de Videoarte, curated by Lisette Lagnado and in the Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga, in Lisbon; OnCurating Project Space, in Zurich; Architecture and Urban Landscapes at MuBE, with Cauê Alves’ curatorship; Rumos Artes Visuais at Itaú Cultural, curated by Agnaldo Farias. Il coltello nella carne, at the Padiglione D’arte Contemporânea (PAC), in Milan, with Jacopo Crivelli’s curatorship.

In 2006, she won FAAP’s Annual Arts Prize; in 2009, Iberê Camargo’s Spotlight Award; in 2011, Videobrasil’s 1st Open Workshop Award. She also was prized with Fundação Joaquim Nabuco’s Videoart Award, was nominated for Fundação Cisneros’ Emergent Artists Prize, both in 2012. In 2017, she was honored the Artistic Prize (Residency Unlimited/UN), from SP-Arte.

She presented an original artwork after being elected in the first 3M’s Exhibition Open Statute, in 2018. Entitled “É preciso continuar”, it put the spotlight on the artist. Set at the center of Largo da Batata, in São Paulo, the artwork had a wide luminous red neon, displaying an excerpt inspired by the novel “L’innommable”, written by the Irish writer Samuel Beckett, after the 2nd World War, in 1953. Her artworks are part of collections on Pinacoteca of São Paulo, Instituto Figueiredo Ferraz and VideoBrasil, among others.